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Appendix A: Background Data

Population and Housing Data

  • Table 1: Total Persons 1980, 1990 & 2000
  • Table 2: Total Dwelling Units 1980, 1990 & 2000
  • Table 3: Characteristics of Housing 2000
  • Table 4: Housing Unit Construction Rates 1997 - 2002
  • Table 5: Housing & Occupancy Characteristics 1990 & 2000
  • Table 6: Median Single-Family Home Value 1990 & 2000
  • Table 7: Home Sales Price Comparison 1989 & 1999
  • Table 8: Age of Population 1980, 1990 & 2000
  • Table 9: Age Characteristics 1990 & 2000

Tax, Income and Business Data

  • Table 10: Comparison of Assessed Tax Valuations: Tax Year 2002
  • Table 11: Comparison of Tax Rates: Tax Year 2002
  • Table 12: Distribution of Taxes: Tax Year 2002
  • Table 13: Median Household Income: 1989 & 1999
  • Table 14: Retail Square Footage per Resident 1999
  • Table 15: Business Establishments: 1994 and 2000

City Recreation and Housing Project Data

  • Table 16: Capital Improvement Plan, 2003-2007
  • Table 17: City Recreation Facilities
  • Table 18: Cleveland Area Recreation Centers
  • Table 19: Condominium Housing Projects (Recent) - Mayfield Heights
  • Table 20: Apartment Buildings - Mayfield Heights

Real Estate Market and Development Impacts Data

  • Table 21: Estimated Development Impacts of Various Types of Land Uses
  • Table 22: Summary of Real Estate Development Market Conditions

TABLE 1

TOTAL PERSONS: 1980, 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1980

1990

Change
1980 - 1990

2000

Change
1990 - 2000

#

%

#

%

Beachwood

9,983

10,677

694

7.0%

12,186

1,509

14%

Gates Mills

2,236

2,508

272

12.2%

2,493

-15

-0.6%

Highland Heights

5,739

6,249

510

8.9%

8,082

1,833

29%

Hunting Valley

633

648

15

2.3%

588

-60

-9.3%

Lyndhurst

18,092

15,982

-2,110

-11.7%

15,279

-703

-4.4%

Mayfield Heights

21,550

19,847

-1,703

-7.9%

19,386

-461

-2.3%

Mayfield Village

3,577

3,462

-115

-3.2%

3,435

-27

-0.8%

Pepper Pike

6,177

6,185

8

0.1%

6,040

-145

-2.3%

Richmond Heights

10,095

9,611

-484

-4.8%

10,944

1,333

14%

               

Cuyahoga County

1,498,400

1,412,140

-86,260

-5.8%

1,393,978

-18,162

-1.3%

Source: U.S. Census

 

TABLE 2

TOTAL DWELLING UNITS: 1980, 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1980

1990

Change
1980 - 1990

2000

Change
1990 - 2000

#

%

#

%

 

Beachwood

3,911

4,732

821

21%

5,447

715

15%

Gates Mills

789

992

203

25.7%

974

-18

-1.8%

Highland Heights

1,794

2,176

382

21.3%

2,862

686

31.5%

Hunting Valley

234

269

35

15%

255

-14

-5.2%

Lyndhurst

6,647

6,729

82

1.2%

6,855

126

1.9%

Mayfield Heights

9,909

10,300

391

3.9%

10,461

161

1.6%

Mayfield Village

1,337

1,416

79

5.9%

1,471

55

3.9%

Pepper Pike

1,891

2,170

279

15%

2,296

126

5.8%

Richmond Heights

4,298

4,503

205

4.8%

5,060

557

12%

               

Cuyahoga County

596,637

604,538

7,901

1.3%

616,903

12,365

2.0%

Source: U.S. Census

 

TABLE 3

CHARACTERISTICS OF HOUSING: 2000

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1-unit detached

1-unit attached(1)

2-4 units per building

5 or more units per building

mobile home, boat, RV, etc.

 

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

#

%

Beachwood

2,882

53%

348

6%

17

1%

2,200

40%

6

1%

Gates Mills

945

100%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

0

0%

Highland Heights

2,789

97%

49

2%

8

1%

16

1%

0

0%

Hunting Valley

232

91%

19

8%

4

2%

0

0%

0

0%

Lyndhurst

5,630

82%

139

2%

51

1%

1,035

15%

0

0%

Mayfield Heights

4,993

48%

380

4%

185

1%

4,903

47%

0

0%

Mayfield Village

1,176

78%

41

3%

13

1%

270

18%

0

0%

Pepper Pike

2,185

95%

45

2%

8

1%

58

3%

0

0%

Richmond Heights

2,783

55%

426

8%

39

1%

1,812

36%

0

0%

 

Cuyahoga County

354,973

57%

37,591

6%

85,038

14%

136,032

22%

3,269

1%

Source: U.S. Census


(1) A unit where the walls separating the unit from another unit extend from the ground to the roof.
 

TABLE 4

HOUSING UNIT CONSTRUCTION RATES: 1997-2002 (1)

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002
(2)

Total 1997 -2001

Annual Average #

Beachwood

28

4

4

2

2

2

40

8

Gates Mills

8

7

10

3

1

3

29

6

Highland Heights

38

43

63

62

51

44

257

51

Hunting Valley

2

2

0

2

0

0

6

1

Lyndhurst

18

4

3

0

2

3

27

5

Mayfield Heights

3

5

58

3

8

21

77

15

Mayfield Village

5

4

3

1

2

0

15

3

Pepper Pike

17

22

8

5

6

1

58

12

Richmond Heights

43

43

41

36

24

26

187

37

Source: U.S. Census


(1) Figures based on the number of single-family residential building permits issued in each community.

(2) Reported through November 2002.

 

TABLE 5

HOUSING AND OCCUPANCY CHARACTERISTICS: 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights

 

Units

Percent of Total

Average Persons
per Unit

1990

2000

1990

2000

1990

2000

Owner-occupied

4,997

4,999

49%

48%

2.5

2.3

Rental

4,814

4,849

47%

46%

1.5

1.6

Total Occupied Units(1)

9,811

9,848

95%

94%

2.0

2.0

Vacant Units

489

613

5%

6%

0

0

TOTAL(2)

10,300

10,461

100%

100%

1.9

1.8

Source: 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census

(1) Persons per occupied unit is the same as persons per household; does not includes persons living in group quarters.

(2) Persons per unit is based on both occupied and vacant units. This figure therefore contains a vacancy factor that is necessary when estimating future population based on projected housing units.

 

TABLE 6

MEDIAN SINGLE-FAMILY HOME VALUE: 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1990

2000

Annual Average % Change

Beachwood

$165,200

$244,700

4.8%

Gates Mills

$309,800

$427,000

3.8%

Highland Heights

$128,200

$217,500

7.0%

Hunting Valley

$500,001

$868,600

7.4%

Lyndhurst

$87,600

$134,600

5.4%

Mayfield Heights

$77,000

$125,900

6.4%

Mayfield Village

$139,200

$201,200

4.5%

Richmond Heights

$97,600

$140,800

4.4%

Pepper Pike

$289,200

$355,500

2.3%

       

Cuyahoga County

$71,200

$113,800

6.0%

Source: U.S. Census

 

TABLE 7

HOME SALES PRICE COMPARISON: 1989 & 1999

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Cuyahoga County Jurisdictions

 

1989

1999

Annual Average % Change

Beachwood

$181,100

$244,900

3.5%

Gates Mills

$276,600

$451,700

6.3%

Highland Heights

$178,800

$266,000

4.9%

Hunting Valley

$745,800

$1,062,300

4.2%

Lyndhurst

$98,500

$133,000

3.5%

Mayfield Heights

$85,600

$125,500

4.7%

Mayfield Village

$143,500

$224,300

5.6%

Pepper Pike

$276,600

$359,600

3.0%

Richmond Heights

$116,800

$156,600

3.4%

       

Cuyahoga County

$85,200

$125,570

4.7%

Cleveland

$38,700

$66,892

7.3%

Source: Cuyahoga County Auditor

 

TABLE 8

AGE OF POPULATION: 1980, 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights

Age Group

1980

1990

2000

Change
1980 - 2000

#

%

65 plus

4,878

5,664

5,335

457

9.4%

45-64

5,591

4,153

4,063

-1528

-27%

18-44

7,264

7,179

6,911

-353

-4.9%

Under 18

3,817

2,851

3,077

-740

-19%

Total Population

21,550

19,847

19,386

-2,164

-10%

Source: U.S. Census

 
 

TABLE 9

AGE CHARACTERISTICS: 1990 & 2000

Mayfield Heights

 

Percentage of Households with
Children Under the Age of 18

1980

1990

2000

 

Mayfield Heights

34%

16%

19%

Cuyahoga County

47%

32%

32%

Northeast Ohio Region(1)

37%

35%

31%

 

Percentage of Households with
Individuals 65+

1980

1990

2000

 

Mayfield Heights

c

41%

41%

Cuyahoga County

c

29%

27%

Northeast Ohio Region

37%

38%

37%

 

Persons per Household

1980

1990

2000

1980-2000
% Change

Mayfield Heights

2.17

2.06

1.95

-10%

Cuyahoga County

2.51

2.46

2.39

-4.8%

Northeast Ohio Region

2.90

2.69

2.57

-11%

Source: U.S. Census


(1) Includes Ashtabula, Cuyahoga, Geauga, Lake, Lorain, Medina, Portage, Stark and Summit Counties.
c Information not readily available.
 

TABLE 10

COMPARISON OF ASSESSED TAX VALUATIONS: TAX YEAR 2002

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

(Sorted highest to lowest by % of Commercial/Industrial Valuation)

COMMUNITY

REAL PROPERTY

TOTAL

Agricultural/Residential

Commercial/Industrial
Public Utility

Beachwood

$289,642,860

45%

$355,707,750

55%

$645,350,610

Mayfield Heights

$249,047,330

53%

$222,082,280

47%

$471,129,610

Mayfield Village

$88,892,340

60%

$60,161,680

40%

$149,054,020

Richmond Heights

$171,013,230

67%

$85,926,950

33%

$256,940,180

Lyndhurst

$305,469,140

80%

$75,104,420

20%

$380,573,560

Highland Heights

$240,801,490

80%

$60,132,380

20%

$300,933,870

Pepper Pike

$298,408,580

89%

$36,729,560

11%

$335,138,140

Hunting Valley

$102,133,650

96%

4,172,170

4%

$106,305,820

Gates Mills

$181,597,960

97%

$5,595,110

3%

$187,193,070

   

Cuyahoga County

$17,434,757,770

68%

$8,390,113,301

32%

$25,824,871,071

Source: Cuyahoga County Auditor’s Office

 

TABLE 11

COMPARISON OF TAX RATES: TAX YEAR 2002

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

Taxing Jurisdiction

Full Tax Rate

Effective Rate

Residential/ Agricultural

Commercial/ Industrial

Beachwood

99.1

54.65

60.84

Gates Mills

94.6

55.1

59.78

Highland Heights

87.7

49.52

53.78

Hunting Valley

103.8

60.46

64.67

Lyndhurst

118.9

73.13

77.06

Mayfield Heights

93.7

55.52

59.78

Mayfield Village

91

49.79

54.55

Pepper Pike

108.2

64.61

68.54

Richmond Heights

104.9

61.21

67.77

Source: Cuyahoga County Treasurer

 

TABLE 12

DISTRIBUTION OF TAXES: TAX YEAR 2002

Mayfield Heights

 

Schools

County

City

Library/ Metropark

Residential

54.99%

22.44%

18.01%

4.56%

Commercial/Industrial

57.48%

21.54%

16.73%

4.25%

Source: Cuyahoga County Treasurer

 

TABLE 13

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: 1989 & 1999

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions

 

1990

2000

% Change

Beachwood

$54,340

$65,406

20%

Gates Mills

$94,219

$133,605

42%

Highland Heights

$44,777

$69,750

56%

Hunting Valley

$125,598

$200,000+

N/A

Lyndhurst

$40,491

$52,272

29%

Mayfield Heights

$28,688

$37,236

30%

Mayfield Village

$46,610

$66,048

42%

Pepper Pike

$100,131

$133,316

3.3%

Richmond Heights

$34,402

$43,625

27%

       

Cuyahoga County

$28,595

$39,168

37%

Source: U.S. Census
 

TABLE 14

Retail Square Footage per Resident

Mayfield Heights and Adjacent Jurisdictions-2000

Municipality

Population 2000

Total Square Ft.
Retail (1999)

Sq. ft Retail/per Resident

Beachwood

12,186

1,864,599

153

Highland Heights

8,082

485,967

60

Lyndhurst

15,279

461,580

30

Mayfield Heights

19,386

1,778,193

92

Mayfield Village

3,435

269,435

78

Richmond Heights

10,944

1,329,393

121

South Euclid

23,537

932,742

40

University Heights

14,146

585,618

41

Source: NOACA Northeast Ohio Regional Retail Analysis, Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, August 2000. (Does not include Legacy Village which opened in 2003)

 

TABLE 15

Business Establishments for 1994 and 2000

Mayfield Heights (zip code 44124)

Business Establishments

1994

2000*

% Change

Agricultural Services, Forestry, Fishing

39

2

 

Construction

91

83

 

Manufacturing

32

20

 

Transportation, Public Utilities

21

11

 

Wholesale Trade

72

78

 

Retail Trade

310

195

 

Finance, Insurance, Real Estate

188

206

 

Services

621

802

 

Information

N/A

13

 

Unclassified

7

12

 

Total Establishments

1,381

1,402

1.5%

Total # of Employees

18,756

27,973

49%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau Zip Code Business Patterns

*Categories changed for 2000; some consolidation of categories was necessary
 

TABLE 16

Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan, City of Mayfield Heights

2003-2007

Project Name/Description

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

 

Roads

Bonnie Lane (East/West Portion) and Bonnie Place Repair and Resurface

$200,000

         

Byron/Gilbert Repair and Resurface

 

$400,000

       

Cedar Road Resurfacing from Landerbrook Drive to Lander Road

$6,000

         

Commonwealth Avenue Repair and Resurface

 

$700,000

       

Elmwood Avenue Repair and Resurface

       

$400,000

 

Genesee Avenue Repair and Resurface

$700,000

         

Giesse Drive (South of Ridgebury) Repair and Resurface

$400,000

         

Longridge/Marshfield Area Streets Repair and Resurface

   

$1,300,000

     

Marsol/Sunningdale/Westerham Resurface

       

$550,000

 

Mayberry/Mayflower Repair and Resurface

     

$250,000

   

Mayfield Road/I271 Improvement from Lander Road to East Corporation Line

 

$5,000,000

       

Peeper Hollow Drive Stream Enclosure

       

$1,000,000

 

Ridgebury Blvd. Repair and Resurfacing

     

$200,000

   

S.O.M. Center Road Resurfacing from Marsol to North Corporation Line

 

$100,000

       

Vallevista/Queens Park Area Streets Repair and Resurface

       

$900,000

 

Water Distribution System

Cedar Road Water Main (Phase III)

$220,000

         

Larchmont Drive/Stafford Area Streets Water Main Replacement

 

$550,000

       

Wastewater Collection

Chelmsford Road Sanitary Relief Sewer (2,030 L.F.)

     

$400,000

   

East & West Miner Roads Sanitary Relief Sewer (2,200 L.F.)

   

$430,000

     

Eastwood Avenue Sanitary Relief Sewer (1,216 L.F.)

 

$250,000

       

Iroquois Avenue Sanitary Relief Sewer (870 L.F.)

 

$200,000

       

Lander Road Sanitary Relief Sewer (1,720 L.F.)

     

$350,000

   

Longridge Road Sanitary Relief Sewer (1,040 L.F.)

   

$200,000

     

Marsol Rd. Sanitary Relief Sewer from Crestwood to Chelmsford

       

$100,000

 

Mayfield Road Sanitary Sewer Replacement from Lander Road to East Corporation Line

 

$1,000,000

       

Mayflower Avenue Sanitary Relief Sewer (400 L.F.)

     

$370,000

   

Ridgeview and Marsol Roads Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation

       

$230,000

 

S.O.M. Center Road Sanitary Sewer Lining

 

$100,000.00

       

Summit Drive Sanitary Relief Sewer (290 L.F.)

 

 $60,000

       

Sunset Road Sanitary Relief Sewer (1,300 L.F.)

   

$350,000

     

Stormwater Collection

Lining of Sanitary and/or Storm Sewers in Sections of Edgewood, Lander, Sunset and Mayfield Ridge

$200,000

         

Lining of Sanitary and Storm Sewers in Sections of Various Streets Within the City

 

$200,000

$200,000

     

Total

$1,726,000

$8,460,000

$2,480,000

$1,570,000

$4,190,000

 

Source: Fisher and Associates, Consulting Engineer to City of Mayfield Heights

 
 
 
 

 

 

Table 17
Existing Parks and Recreational Facilities

 

Name/Size

Location

Year Built

Year Improved

City Park/19.5ac

1533 Chelmsford Road

   

Charles Dragga Municipal Pool

1533 Chelmsford Road

1958

1980

Wading Pool

Next to Municipal Pool

2000

 

Concession Stand

Next to Municipal Pool

2000

 

Skatepark

City Park, near pool

2001

 

Basketball Courts (2)

City Park, near pool

 

2001

Totland Playground

City Park, near pool

2002

 

Permanent Restroom Facilities

City Park, near pool

2003

 

Bocce Courts (4)

City Park, near pool

   

Gazebo

City Park, off Marsol Road

 

2003

Blue Playground

City Park, near Gazebo

1999

 

Picnic Pavilions (2)

City Park, near Gazebo

   

Tennis Courts (4)

City Park, near Gazebo

   

Ball Fields

City Park

   

Fornaro Field

City Park

   

Kobe Softball Field

City Park

   

Dragga Softball Field

City Park, near Tennis Courts

   

Permanent Restroom Facility

City Park, near pool

2003

 

Ross C. DeJohn Park/Community Center

6306 Marsol Road

1977

 

Ball Fields

     

Roberto Softball Field

     

Hoehnen LL Field

     

Nagel LL Field

     

Concession Stand

     

Community Center, 6,840 square feet

     

Oakville Park/1.5ac

5875 Oakville Road

   

Oakville Field

Oakville Park

   

Oakville Pavilion

Oakville Park

   

Oakville Playground

Oakville Park

1998

 

Oakville Bocce Courts

Oakville Park

1998

 

Shared Facilities

     

Lander Elementary/3.0ac

1714 Lander Road

   

Mayfield Middle School/10.0ac

1123 SOM Center Road

   

Mayfield High School/5.3ac

6116 Wilson Mills Road

   
 

TABLE 18

Cleveland Area Recreation Centers

             

Recently Constructed Recreation Centers in the Cleveland Metropolitan Area

   
       
     

Size in

 

Yearly

 

City

 

Opened

square feet

Cost to build

operating cost

Open to non-residents?

Brecksville

1992

49,000

$6.6 million

$1.8 million

No

Macedonia

2000

55,000

$6.8 million

$920,000

Yes

Medina

2002

107,000

$15 million

$1.5 million*

Yes

Middleburg Heights

2000

83,000

$17 million

$2.4 million

On a limited basis

Seven Hills

2003

50,100

$7.3 million

N/A

No

Strongsville

1998

157,000

$18.1 million

$2.5 million

Yes

Twinsburg

1999

97,000

$12 million

$1 million

Open to school district

SOURCES: THE PLAIN DEALER 4/28/03 (from data provided by the cities' recreation departments)

     

*Projected

           
             

TABLE 19

New Attached and Cluster Housing Projects in Mayfield Heights (as of Fall 2003)


Name and Location of Project

Developer

Zoning

Status

# and type units

Average Square Ftg.

Price Range

Acreage

Density

Pheasant Woods
SOM/Marsol area

Snavely

U-2(a)(1)

Complete

56 condos

2,000 sf (plus)

N/A

10 acres

5.7 du/acre

Wildflower I
Lander/Cedar area
Parcel 2

Kingdom

U-2(a)(1)

In development

18 Attached
Single Family Triplex Cluster

2,500

$350,000+

3.91

4.75 du/acre

Wildflower II
Lander/Cedar area
Parcel 1

Kingdom

U-2(a)(1)

Approved, not yet started

12 Attached
Single Family Triplex Cluster

2,500

$350,000+

2.70

4.75 du/acre

Wildflower III
Lander/Cedar area
Parcel 3

Kingdom

U-2(a)(1)

Approved, not yet started

27 Attached
Single Family Triplex Cluster

2,500

$350,000+

5.76

4.75 du/acre

Bridgeport

Kingdom

U-2(a)(1)

Approved
Site Work Started

47 Detached SF units
Single and Duplex Cluster

3,000 -
3,500

$500,000 -
$600,000

14.25

3.3 du/acre

Stone Creek
SOM/Ridgebury area

Four Seasons

Rezoned to
U-2(a)(1)

Approved
Site Clearing Started

125 Total Units
S.F. Triplex + Duplex Cluster

2,600

$250,000 -
$325,000

27.5

4.55 du/acre

Woodhawk

N/A

U-3

Completed

236

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Woodhawk
Apartment Conversion (4 Buildings)

Capreit

U-3

48 Converted 144 in the process

192

1,100

$124,000 -
$185,000

N/A

N/A

Landerhaven Court
Lander/Cedar area

N/A

U-2(a)(1)

Completed

14

2,500 sf (plus)

N/A

4 acres

3.5 du/acre

Source: City of Mayfield Heights Building Department information, supplemented by other data.
 

TABLE 20

Apartment Buildings in Mayfield Heights

Complex Name

Address

 

# Units

Ranchland Gardens

1400 Ranchland Drive

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

16

Mayland Manor

1575-1583 Mallard Dr.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

40

       

Mayland Towers

1585-1587 Mallard

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

80

Hawthorne Park

1560-1617 Hawthorne Drive

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

72

Mayfair Park

 

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

N/A

Golden Gate Gardens

6300-6334 Maplewood Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

144

Gates Mills Villa

6755 Mayfield Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

191

Pepperwood

1420-1458 Golden Gate Blvd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

132

Plymouth Park

6484-6643 Maplewood Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

300

Blake House

1165 SOM Center Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

36

       

Hamilton House

200 & 250 Chatham Way

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

400

Howard Robbins Tower

6755 Mayfield Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

191

Luther House

1221 Drury Ct.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

119

Schnurmann House

(A and B)

1223-27 Julius Weil Dr.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

198

Villa Serena

6800 Mayfield Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

231

Grandview Towers

6805/09/11 Mayfield Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

1,077

Gates Mills Club

6759 Mayfield Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

120

Medbridge

 

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

Wynwood

6700 Larchmont Dr.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

116

Marsol

6501-6511 Marsol Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

986

Coppertree Apartments

1414 & 1422 SOM Center Rd.

Mayfield Hts., Ohio 44124

342

Sources: City of Mayfield Heights, Building Department, Apartment Inventory 2000.

"Affordable Senior Apartments," Western Reserve Area Agency on Aging.

 

TABLE 21

Estimated Economic Impacts of General Land Use Categories

 

Floor Area
per acre
(square feet)

Estimated Real Estate Value
(per acre)

Property Tax Generated
(per acre)1

Property Tax Distributed to Village
(per acre )2

Jobs Created
(per acre)
3

Average Salary
(per job)4

Income Tax Distributed to City
(per acre)5

Average Daily Vehicle Trips
(per acre)

Hotel6

20,000

$1,750,000

$36,615

$6,225

14

$11,182

$1,565

405

General Office

15,000

$1,500,000

$31,385

$5,335

45

$47,485

$21,368

165

Professional/Technical Services

15,000

$1,500,000

$31,385

$5,335

45

$50,573

$22,758

165

Commercial/Retail

12,000

$960,000

$20,086

$3,415

24

$19,144

$4,595

240 - 720

Personal/Business Services

12,000

$960,000

$20,086

$3,415

24

$20,578

$4,939

--

Light Industrial

9,000

$540,000

$11,298

$1,921

18

--

N/A

63

Heavy Industrial

9,000

$540,000

$11,298

$1,921

8

$44,923

$3,594

14

Manufacturing

9,000

$540,000

$11,298

$1,921

20

$44,923

$8,985

36

Warehouse

9,000

$540,000

$11,298

$1,921

14

$35,744

$5,004

45

Planned Residential7

7,200

$900,000

$17,489

$3,148

0

$0

$0

23

Single-Family Residential8

5,000

$750,000

$14,574

$2,623

0

$0

$0

19

Source: D. B. Hartt, Inc. analysis.


(1) (Real estate value x 0.35)/1,000 x effective tax rate; 2002 effective tax rates for Mayfield Heights = $55.52 (Residential) and $59.78 (Commercial/industrial) per $1,000 of assessed valuation.

(2) Calculated at 17% of total property tax for commercial and 18% of total property tax for residential as the portion that flows to the City of Mayfield Heights.

(3) Source: Development Impact Assessment Handbook (1994), Robert W. Burchell, et al.

(4) Source: US Economic Census Cuyahoga County Business Profile (2000) www.osuedc.org

(5) Mayfield Heights income tax = 1%.

(6) Assumes 45 rooms (444 square feet each) per acre.

(7) Assumes development density of 4 du/acre @ 1,800 square feet per unit (calculated using 5.86 trips per du).

(8) Assumes development density of 2 du/acre @ 2,500 square feet per unit (calculated using 9.57 trips per du).

 

TABLE 22

Cleveland Real Estate Development Conditions

 

Competition for Retail and Office

With respect to the retail market in the Cleveland region, Colliers International (2002) refers to the major retail area at Mayfield Road and I-271 in Mayfield Heights as "the old standby" that has been able to maintain it popularity in the region by continuing to expand and bring in new stores. But the report gives first mention to the lifestyle center in Lyndhurst's Legacy Village, opening in Fall, 2003, with 615,000 square feet of retail space. Also scheduled for completion at the end of summer 2003 is University Square in University Heights, which houses such tenants as Tops, Target, Joann Fabrics and more. These new shopping centers, combined with other major nearby retail facilities like Greens of Lyndhurst, Beachwood Place/La Place and the Richmond Mall, constitute significant competition for the retail offerings in Mayfield Heights.

Colliers International (2002) reports that vacancy rates in the region's office market rose slightly in the first half of 2002 due largely to increased vacancies in Cleveland's Central Business District. Vacancy rates in the suburban submarkets, however, generally declined (despite the departure of TRW corporate offices); but the eastern submarket produced the most marked decreases in vacancy rates, largely as a result of Progressive Insurance Company's commitment to lease office space in the EastPoint and Landerbrook Corporate Center I and II office complexes.

While the Landerbrook office development holds promise for Mayfield Heights, Office Buildings (2001) notes that about 3,800,000 square feet of office space were either proposed or under construction (as of winter 2001-2002) in nearby places like Signature Square III, Science Park Drive, Chagrin Highlands in Beachwood, and Overlook Court IV in Warrensville Heights. Rent levels in the eastern submarket remain among the highest in the Cleveland region for Class "A", "B", and "C" office space.

Sources: Colliers International, Commercial Real Estate Report, 2002.
Office Buildings

 
Appendix B: Summary of Current Zoning
 Table 1: Permitted Uses in Residential Districts
 Table 2: Development Standards in Residential Districts
 Table 3: Permitted Uses in Commercial Districts
 Table 4: Development Standards in Commercial Districts
 
 

TABLE 1
GENERALIZED SUMMARY OF PERMITTED USES IN RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS

 

U-1

U-2

U-2-A

U-3

U-3-A

U-3-B

U-3-C

 

Single-family(1)

Two-family

PUD(2)

Garden Apt

Medium High-rise

High-rise

Senior Care

  1. Residential
             
  1. Single-family detached dwellings

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

  1. Single-family attached dwellings
   

P

       
  1. Two-family, duplex or double dwellings
 

P

 

P

P

P

P

  1. Apartment Houses
     

P

P

P

P

  1. Medium high-rise apartments
       

P

P

P

  1. Senior citizen apartments
           

P

  1. Rest & nursing homes
           

P

C. Community Facilities/Institutions

             
  1. Churches, temples, child care services (within churches, temples and schools), public libraries, and the city hall, including services rendered by the municipality

P

P

 

P

P

P

P

  1. Public & private schools

P

P

 

P

P

P

P

C. Open Space, Recreation

             
  1. Public parks, playgrounds, public recreation buildings and the City fire and police stations

P

P

 

P

P

P

P

  1. Public, private and semi-private golf courses

P

P

 

P

P

P

P

D. Other

             
  1. Accessory buildings

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

  1. Medical & health care facilities
           

A

  1. Other uses deemed appropriate by the Planning Commission
   

P

       
  1. Restaurants located in an apartment hotel
     

A

A

A

A

  1. Lounges, snack bars, coffee shops, health clubs, etc.
       

A

A

A

P = Use permitted by right C = Conditional use A = Accessory use

(1) There are subdistricts.

(2) There are subdistricts.

 

TABLE 2

GENERALIZED SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS IN RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS

 

U-1(2)

U-1 (Estate)

U-1(1)

U-2

U-2-A

U-2-A(1)

U-3

U-3(1)

U-3-A

U-3-B

U-3-C

 

Single-family

Single-family

Single-family

Two-family

PUD

PUD

Garden Apt

Garden Apt

Medium High-rise

High-rise

Senior Care

A. Lot Requirements

                     
  1. Minimum project area
       

40 acres

3 acres

3 acres

3 acres

12 acres

20 acres

12 acres

  1. Maximum density (units per acre)
 

N/A

   

3.5

4.75

15

32

54

32

  1. Minimum lot size/land area per dwelling unit (in square feet)
                     
  1.  
    1. Single Family

40,000

20,000

8,500

8,500

   

8,500

       
  1.  
    1. Two-family/per unit
     

5,000

   

5,000

       
  1.  
    1. Multi-family/per unit
           

2,904

 

1,351

800

1,351

  1. Maximum units per structure
 

N/A

   

8

           
  1. Minimum lot width

100 ft

100 ft

60 ft

60 ft

   

60 ft SF
200 MF

300 ft

200 ft

200 ft

400 ft

  1. Required open space
       

50%

         

1.5 acres of park

  1. Maximum lot coverage
 

N/A

                 
  1.  
    1. Buildings and pavement
         

50%

         
  1.  
    1. Buildings
           

30%

 

30%

 

30%

  1.  
    1. Principal buildings
                 

20%

 

B. Minimum Yard Depth/Building Spacing

                     
  1. Front yard
                     
  1.  
    1. From street right-of-way
   

35 ft

35 ft

50 ft

90 ft+

35 ft

35 ft

     
  1.  
    1. From street centerline

110 ft

100 ft

           

150 ft

170 ft

150 ft

  1.  
    1.  
      1. S.O.M. & Lander Rd
   

110 ft

110 ft

             
  1.  
    1.  
      1. Mayfield Rd
   

120 ft

120 ft

             
  1. Side yard

Min. 5 ft; total side yards = 20% avg. lot width

20 ft+

30 ft

25-50 ft based on bldg ht

50 ft

50 fta

50 fta

  1. Rear yard

20% of avg. lot depth, or 40 ft whichever is less, but at least 1/2 height of building

20 ft+

30 ft

25-50 ft based on bldg ht

50 fta

50 ftab

50 fta

  1. Minimum building spacing

NA

Ht of tallest building+

15 ft+

25-50 ft based on bldg ht

Ht of tallest building+

Ht of tallest building+

Ht of tallest building+

C. Floor Area Requirements (in square feet)

1,500 – 2,000

1,300

900 – 1,400

 

1,200 + 200 per addl.BR

 

1,000-1,800

 

500-1,050

500-1,050

490-715

D. Maximum Building Height (principal building)

35 ft

 

30 ft

30 ft

2 stories / 35 ft

 

3 stories / 35 ft

2 stories / 24 ft

70 ft

120 ft

70 ft

Abutting any residential district.

30 ft abutting all other districts.

Depends based on lot width.

Section 1195.05 includes a general regulation for building height when not otherwise stated in the district regulations – 35 feet, except 30 feet for lots with less than 100 feet of lot width.

Two-story buildings prohibited.

 
TABLE 3
GENERALIZED LIST OF PERMITTED USES IN COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS
 

U-4

U-4-A

U-4-B

U-6

U-7

U-8

 
 

Local retail and wholesale

Development districts

Planned office and restrictive service districts

Cemetery

Headquarters or executive offices park

Office, engineering, medical and research building

 

A. Office

             
  1. General and professional offices

P

P

P

 

P

P

 
  1. Banks

P

P

P

       

B. Retail and Services

             
  1. Stores

P

P

NP

       
  1. Restaurants

P

P

NP

       
  1. Nightclubs, bars
 

P

         
  1. Movie theaters

P

P

         
  1. Motels and hotels

P

P

         
  1. Gasoline stations (with restrictions)

P

P

NP

       
  1. Car washes (with restrictions)

P

P

NP

       
  1. Automobile services (with restrict.)

P

P

NP

       
  1. Automobile agencies (sales)
 

P

NP

       
  1. Other Services
             
  1. Places of assembly
 

P

         
  1. Museums and libraries
 

P

         
  1. Recreation including bowling, swimming pools skating, etc,
 

P

         
  1. Cemetery, mausoleum
   

P

P

     
  1. Day care
       

P

   
  1. Hospital
         

P

 
  1. Industry
             
  1. Engineering
         

P

 
  1. Research
       

P

P

 
 

P = Use permitted by right C = Conditional use A = Accessory use NP= Not permitted

 
TABLE 4
GENERALIZED SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS IN COMMERCIAL DISTRICTS(1)
 

U-4

U-4-A

U-4-B

U-6

U-7

U-8

 

Local retail and wholesale

Develop’t districts

Planned office & res. service districts

Cemetery

HQs/ Executive Offices Park Districts

1179.01 Hospitals

1179.02 Office, medical, etc.

A. Lot Requirements

             
  1. Gross Site Area
       

45 acres

   
  1. Minimum lot size
 

3 acres

   

6 acres; 3 acres for lots in subdiv.

   
  1. Minimum lot width

100 ft

 

200 ft

 

 300 ft

   
  1. Maximum building lot
 

30%

   

15-25% depend on bldg. ht. 

30%

30%

B. Minimum Yard Depth

             
  1. Front yard(2)
             
  1.  
    1. Primary streets
 

250 ft from centerline

   

225 ft from centerline

250 ft from centerline

120 ft from centerline

  1.  
    1. Secondary streets
       

140 ft from centerline

   
  1. Side yard
             
  1.  
    1. Adj. to residential districts

25 ft, unless building is 50 ft+ back from street

30 ft

25 ft, unless building is 50 ft+ back from street

 

100 ft

100 ft

10 ft

  1.  
    1. Adj. to other district
       

25 ft from lot line or ht of bldg, WIG

100 ft

10 ft

  1. Rear yard
             
  1.  
    1. Adj. to residential districts

20% of lot depth or 25 ft WIG, up to a max of 40', but not < 1/2 building ht

30 ft

20% of lot depth or 25 ft WIG, up to a max of 40', but not < 1/2 building ht

 

100 ft

150 ft

25 ft

  1.  
    1. Adj. to other district
       

40 ft

150 ft

25 ft

C. Required Parking Setback/Landscaping Strips

             
  1. Front yard
   

30 ft

   

60 ft

10 ft

  1. Side yard
             
  1.  
    1. Adj. to res. districts
   

10 ft

   

50 ft

30 ft

  1.  
    1. Adj. to other district
   

10 ft

   

10 ft

10 ft

  1. Rear yard
             
  1.  
    1. Adj. to res. districts
   

10 ft

   

100 ft

50 ft

  1.  
    1. Adj. to other district
   

10 ft

   

10 ft

15 ft

D. Maximum Building Height (principal building)(1)

   

2 stories or 25 ft above grade

 

3 stories or 40 ft above grade

60 ft

55 ft

(2) Section 1195.04 includes general setback requirements of 110 feet from centerline of SOM, Cedar, and Lander, 120 feet from centerline of Mayfield and 35 feet from right-o-way of all other streets.

(1) Section 1195.05 includes general standard for building height when not otherwise stated in the district regulations – 35 ft, except 30 ft for lots with < 100 ft lot width.

 

Appendix C: Additional Resources

• Summary of Transportation Solutions: Institute of Transportation Engineers
• Greater Cleveland RTA: Transit Map for Mayfield Heights Area
• Sources of Funding for Local Governments—General
• Sources of Funding for Local Governments- Greenspace, Parks and Recreation
• Summary of Retail Strategies: Cuyahoga County Planning Commission
 
 

Getting Most Out of the Existing System

Building New Road Capacity

Providing Public Transportation Services

Managing Transportation Demand

Urban Freeways

  • Incident Detection and Management/Information
  • Ramp Metering
  • High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lanes and Pricing
  • Park-n-ride facilities

Multi-Modal Corridor Strategies

System Service Expansion

  • Rail/Fixed Guideway

Alternative Modes

  • Ridesharing
  • Bike/Walk

Arterials and Local Streets—Design

  • Directional street alterations
  • Access Management
  • Traffic Calming

New Highways

System/Service Improvements

  • Fixed Route and Express Bus Service Changes
  • Paratransit Service Changes

Public/Private Actions

  • Staggered Work Hours
  • Telecommuting and Alternative Work Arrangements
  • Transportation Management Associations (TMAs)

Arterials and Local Streets—Operations

  • Signal Coordination
  • Traffic Turn Prohibitions
  • Improved Devices

Access Control and Management

Supporting Actions and Policies

  • Fare Structures
  • Transit-Oriented Development
  • Parking Pricing to Support Transit
  • Technology

Local Government Actions

  • Shared Parking and Parking Management
  • Trip Reduction Ordinances

Arterials and Local Streets—Management

  • HOV on Arterials
  • Parking Management
  • Freight Management
  • Bike/Ped Routes
  • Traffic Enforcement

Geometric Design

   
 

Reconstruction and Traffic Management

   
 
  • Grade Separation
   

Summarized from: “A Toolbox for Alleviating Traffic Congestion”, Institute of Transportation Engineers, 1997

 
 

General Information on Funding Sources for Development

GENERAL LOCAL RESOURCES

Tax Increment Financing (TIF)
• A portion of the future increase in assessed valuation of real property from real property taxation is designated as “exempt” from local property taxation.
• A payment in lieu of taxes is made by property owners back to the public body in the amount of the taxes that otherwise would have to be paid on such real property improvements, creating a “cash flow.” The cash flow may be used to pay for public infrastructure improvements connected to a public purpose—either on a “pay as you go basis” or through local debt issuance (where the stream of revenues is used to retire the debt issued).
• Up to 75% exemption for up to 10 years. With school board approval, can extend to 100% exemption for 30 years.
• TIF has been used in Ohio for both large-scale and smaller-scale economic development initiatives.

Community Reinvestment Area (CRA)
• Local tax incentive program for businesses that expand or locate in designated areas.
• Provides up to a 100% exemption of the improved real estate property tax valuation for up to 15 years (as a tax abatement).
• In some instances, local school board approval may be required.

Enterprise Zone Tax Incentive Program (EZ)
• Local tax incentive program for businesses that expand or locate in designated areas.
• Provides up to a 75% exemption on real property improvements or tangible personal property tax valuation for up to 10 years. Local school board approval may be required to exceed these limits.

Payroll Tax Sharing Program
• The City of Parma recently implemented an economic development grant program for the purpose of attracting businesses to locate within the City and to encourage expansion of businesses currently located in the City.
• The City may share up to 50% of the new payroll tax remitted to the City for a period up to 10 years with the new or expanding businesses. Grants are awarded from the net change in payroll tax proceeds of the business with reference to either Real Property or Tangible Personal Property.

 
COUNTY FUNDED PROGRAMS

Competitive Municipal Grant Program
Cuyahoga County Department of Development(1)


(1) This is a subset of the complete programs available from the Cuyahoga County Department of Development (www.cuyahoga.oh.us/development)
 

GENERAL LOCAL RESOURCES
• Up to $150,000 per year.
• Used for major public enhancements such as right-of-way improvements, streetscape enhancements, senior citizen centers and ADA improvements.
• Up to $25,000 per community available for community master planning (when funds are available).

Cuyahoga County Storefront Renovation Program
Cuyahoga County Department of Development
• Grants for architectural services (up to $2,000 or 8% of material costs).
• Loans for exterior and interior building improvements, including building code
improvements and signage (up to $75,000 per parcel at negotiated interest rates for twelve years, with monthly payments beginning six months after closing).
• Up to 20% of total project cost can be applied to parking lots and sidewalks.
• Those property owners that are able to provide 10% equity based on total material and labor cost, current on all taxes at loan closing, and able to complete the improvements within one year.

 

Cuyahoga County Economic Development Loan Program
Cuyahoga County Department of Development

• Assists viable business expansion projects that need County loan funds to secure private financing. Assists projects that have a substantial benefit to the community and positively impacts the County.
• Loans range from $35,000 to $350,000 (not to exceed 40% of the total project cost) up to 15 year term. A minimum of 10% owner equity is required.
• Business must create one full time job for every $35,000 loaned. 51% of all jobs created or retained must be available to persons of low or moderate income.
• Loans can be used to finance capital equipment, land, buildings, construction and building renovation.

 

Strategic Initiatives Fund
Cuyahoga County Department of Development

    Same as above, except market rate loans up to $1 million for up to 20 year term.
 

Brownfield Redevelopment Fund
Cuyahoga County Department of Development

• Provides financing and subsidies to acquire land, perform Phase I and Phase II environmental testing, remediation, site clearance and demolition to obtain full use of underutilized commercial/industrial properties within Cuyahoga County that require environmental remediation such as the removal of underground gasoline tanks, asbestos or other environmental hazards.
• Sites eligible for the Voluntary Action Program (VAP) of Ohio qualify for the program.
• Municipal corporations, non-profit development corporations and private developers/businesses may apply for loans up to $1 million per project for up to 15 years. Subsidies, up to $500,000, may be granted to municipal corporation applicants that take ownership of the property.
 
STATE PROGRAMS(2)

State Capital Improvements Program (Issue 2)
Ohio Public Works Commission


(2) Additional funding programs available from the Ohio Department of Developent can also be found at www.odod.state.oh.us/cdd/ohcp
• The SCIP funds are derived from the issuance of State of Ohio debt referred to as “Issue 2” funds.
• Eligible projects: bridges and culverts, roads, solid waste disposal facilities, stormwater and sanitary collection/storage and treatment facilities, water supply systems, and wastewater treatment systems.
• Costs eligible for fund: acquisition of property and facilities, engineering and design, construction, equipment and related financing costs.
• Types of funding available: up to 90% of project’s total cost if it is a repair or
replacement project and up to 50% of a project’s total cost if it is a new or expansion project.
A. Grants: 80% of program’s allocation is awarded in grants, with a
minimum requirement of 10% provided in local matching funds.
B. Loans and local debt support: 20% of program’s allocation must be awarded in the form of interest free loans or in the form of local debt support. Applicants can request up to 100% funding in the form of a loan. Two types of local debt support funding are available:
1. Loan assistance: Loan assistance funds are awarded in the form of a grant to pay the interest costs associated with a loan from either a public or private lender or a bond/note issuance.
2. Credit enhancement: Credit enhancement funds are awarded in the form of a grant that can be used to cover the up-front purchase of a private bond insurance policy.
• In Cuyahoga County, this program is administered through the District One Public Works Integrating Committee (DOPWIC) via the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission; approximately $21 million is available countywide on an annual basis.
 

State Capital Improvements Revolving Loan Fund
Ohio Public Works Commission

• Eligible projects: bridges and culverts, roads, solid waste disposal facilities, stormwater and sanitary collection/storage treatment facilities, water supply systems, and wastewater treatment facilities.
• Costs eligible for funding: acquisition of property and facilities, engineering and design, construction, equipment, and related financing costs.
• All awards are in the form of loans covering up to 100% of the total project cost.
 

Clean Ohio Funds (Issue 1)

• The Clean Ohio program funds are provided by the issuance of State of Ohio debt referred to as “Issue 1” funds.
• Eligible projects: open space, riparian corridor and watershed preservation, greenways and similar projects.
• In Cuyahoga County, this program is administered by the County’s Natural Resources Assistance Council (as appointed by the DOPWIC referenced earlier) via the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission.
 

Local Transportation Improvement Program (LTIP)
Ohio Public Works Commission

• Eligible projects: roads, bridges and culverts.
• Costs eligible for funding: acquisition of property and facilities, engineering and design, construction, and equipment.
• All awards are in the form of grants covering up to 100% of total project cost.
 

Water and Sewer Rotary Commission

• Eligible projects: water and sewer lines.
• Interest-free loans.
 

Ohio Water Development Authority

• Eligible projects: drinking water, wastewater, construction projects, planning.
• Loans at market interest rates with a 10-25 year payback; borrower maximum $75 million.
 

Ohio Water Pollution Control Loan Fund
Ohio Environmental Protection Agency

• Eligible projects: publicly owned wastewater treatment facilities/non-point source water pollution control projects.

• Loans are below market rate.

 

319 Program
Ohio EPA

• Funding supports Ohio’s Nonpoint Source Management Program to protect and/or restore water resources affected by nonpoint sources of pollution.

• Projects funded (lasting up to three years) include education, technical assistance,
financial incentives, and other voluntary action.
• Applicants can apply for up to $300,000 for projects and $100,000 to develop a
Watershed Action Plan; requires 40% match.

 

NatureWorks

• Funding is available for nonpoint source pollution prevention projects protecting riparian areas along streams through the purchase of perpetual conservation easements.
 
FEDERALLY-FUNDED PROGRAMS

TEA-21 (Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century)
U.S. Department of Transportation

• Funding for highways, highway safety and transit through fiscal year 2003.
• Safety improvements include road and rail highway grade crossing safety.
• Environmental improvements include transportation enhancements improving community quality, transit benefits, pilot program for sustainable communities, National Scenic Byways Program, bicycle and pedestrian paths (Ohio recreational Trails Program) and recreational trails.
• Funding for access to jobs (i.e., Welfare to Work), disadvantaged business enterprise program, workforce training.
• Expanded highway programs include interstate, bridges and congestion and air quality improvements.
 

Miscellaneous

• Economic Development Administration Loans and Grants.
• Land and Water Conservation Fund for park and outdoor recreational development.
 

NON-GOVERNMENTALLY FUNDED PROGRAMS

Business Improvement District (BID)

• Business owners and merchants within the BID are permitted under state laws to use the city’s tax collection system to tax themselves; these funds, collected by the municipality are returned in full to the BID and are used for the physical and service improvements previously mentioned.
 

Charitable Foundation Grants

• Charitable foundation grants help “sponsor” certain community development projects such as landscaping, streetscaping and technical assistance in the maintenance of community facilities (examples of the largest local foundations include the Cleveland Foundation and the George Gund Foundation).
• There are more than 1,000 local family and community foundations in Ohio.
 

Sources of Funding for Greenspace, Park and Recreation

The matrix below includes a list of existing sources of greenspace funding available from federal, state, and local government agencies, and from non-profit organizations. The column headings indicate the primary use for the program’s funds and are intended as a quick source for identifying programs that may be applicable for specific greenspace-related activities. Many programs have web sites that provide more detailed descriptions of the program, along with information on where to apply for funds.

Ohio Greenways also publishes a hardcopy summary of various state and federal sources of funding for greenway projects. The U.S. EPA maintains a Catalog of Funding Sources for Watershed Protection. In addition, there are a number of organizations such as the Rails-to-Trails Conservancy, The Trust for Public Land, and The Nature Conservancy that work with communities to assist in finding funding for projects.
 
 

Program

Planning

Aquisition/Easement

Watershed/Habitat Protection

Pollution Reduction/Cleanup

Capital Improvements

Trails

Labor/Consult.

Maintenance

Administration

Research

Education/Community Participation

Technical Assistance

Economic Development

FEDERAL GOVERNMENT

Environmental Protection Agency

Environmental Education Grants 66.951

                   

X

   

Environmental Justice Grants 66.604

                 

X

X

X

 

Evironmental Protection_Consolidated Research 66.500

                 

X

     

Wetlands Protection: Develop. Grants 66.461

X

 

X

                   

Environmental Research Grants

                 

X

     

Great Lakes Program 66.469

   

X

X

         

X

X

X

 

Superfund Technical Assistance Grant 66.806

           

X

       

X

 

Department of the Interior

North American Wetlands Conservation Fund 15.623

 

X

X

X

                 

Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance 15.921

                     

X

 

National Coastal Wetland Conservation Grant

 

X

X

       

X

X

       

Land & Water Consrv. Funds (apply through ODNR)

 

X

   

X

X

             

Dept. of Transportation - FHWA

Transportation & Community & System Preservation

X

X

   

X

X

     

X

   

X

Department of Agriculture

Conservation Reserve Program 10.069

   

X

                   

Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention 10.904

X

 

X

X

X

           

X

 

Watershed Surveys and Planning 10.906

X

               

X

     

Wetlands Reserve Program 10.072

   

X

                   

Challenge Cost-Share Grant Program

X

               

X

X

   

Department of Commerce - NOAA

Habitat Conservation 11.463

   

X

         

X

X

X

   

Dept. of Housing and Urban Development

Community Outreach Partnership Center 14.511

X

               

X

X

   

Corp. for National and Community Service

Americorps

           

X

X

   

X

   

Retired & Senior Volunteer Program

           

X

     

X

   

STATE GOVERNMENT

Ohio Department of Natural Resources

Greenworks

                   

X

   

Ohio Bicentennial Legacy Tree Planting Program

       

X

               

Clean Ohio Trails Fund

X

X

   

X

X

             

Coastal Management Assistance Grants

X

 

X

X

X

               

Land & Water Conservation Funds

 

X

   

X

X

             

Natureworks

 

X

X

X

X

X

 

X

         

Recreational Trails Program

X

X

   

X

X

 

X

   

X

   

Watershed Coordinators

X

             

X

   

X

 

Boating Infrastructure Grant Program

       

X

               

Boating Safety Education

                   

X

   

Clean Vessel Act

       

X

               

Cooperative Public Boating Facility Projects

       

X

               

Grassland Restoration: Pastures-to-Prairies

   

X

                   

Wetland Restoration

   

X

X

X

               

Ohio Wildlife Diversity Projects

X

X

X

X

       

X

X

X

   

Ohio Department of Transportation

Bicycle/Pedstrian Program (STP Funds)

 

X

   

X

X

             

Transportation Enhancements (STP Funds)

       

X

X

       

X

   

National Scenic Byways Program

X

 

X

 

X

X

       

X

   

Public Lands Highways Discretionary Program

X

X

   

X

X

             

Ohio Department of Development

Brownfields/Clean Ohio Fund

     

X

X

               
 

Urban and Rural Initiative Program

 

X

 

X

               

X

Ohio EPA

Section 319 - Nonpoint Source Pollution

X

 

X

           

X

X

X

 

Water Pollution Control Loan Fund

 

X

X

X

X

           

X

 

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program

X

X

X

X

                 

Volutary Action Program (Brownfields Cleanup)

     

X

               

X

Pollution Prevention Loan Program

     

X

X

               

Ohio Environmental Education Fund

                   

X

X

 

List of Other Grant, Loan and Tax Incentive Progs.

                         

Ohio Lake Erie Commission

Lake Erie Protection Fund

X

 

X

X

         

X

X

   

LOCAL AREA GOVERNMENTS

NOACA

Transportation Enhancements (STP Funds)

       

X

X

       

X

   

Metroparks

Agency budget

X

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

PRIVATE & NON-PROFIT

Gund Foundation

Environment Grants

X

X

X

           

X

X

 

X

Bikes Belong

Grant Proposal (TEA-21 funds)

       

X

X

             

Captain Planet Foundation

Environmental projects for youth and children

                   

X

   

Chevron

Conservation Awards

 

X

X

X

           

X

   

Conservation Fund

Kodak American Greenways Award

X

X

   

X

X

X

 

X

 

X

   

Great Lakes Revolving Loan Fund

 

X

                     

Environmental Support Center

Environmental Loan Fund

               

X

   

X

 

eSchool News Online

Links to various environmental education grants

                   

X

   

Ford Foundation

Community and Resource Development

 

X

X

 

X

               

The Foundation Center

Search engine for locating grants

                         

Great Lakes Commission

Soil Erosion & Sediment Control

X

 

X

X

X

     

X

X

X

X

 

Great Lakes Protection Fund

Environmental Endowment

   

X

X

                 

Ittleson Foundation

The Environment

                 

X

X

   

Land Trust Alliance

Midwest Program

X

         

X

 

X

 

X

   

National Endowment for the Arts

New Public Works

X

                       

National Gardening Association

Youth Garden Grants Program

                   

X

   

National Fish and Wildlife Foundation

Bring Back the Natives Grant

   

X

X

                 

Five Star Restoration Challenge Grants

   

X

X

           

X

   

FMC Corporation Bird and Habitat Conserv Fund

 

X

X

           

X

X

   

Migratory Bird Conservancy

 

X

X

X

         

X

X

   

Wild Birds Unlimited Pathways to Nature Cons Fund

       

X

         

X

   

Pulling Together Initiative (Weed Management)

             

X

X

 

X

   

Wildlife Links (Golf Courses)

                 

X

 

X

 

National Tree Trust

Partnership Enhancement Program

       

X

   

X

X

 

X

   

The Nature Conservancy

Education & technical assistance

 

X

               

X

X

 

North American Association for Environmental Educ.

Links to various environmental education grants

                   

X

   

Rails to Trails Conservancy

Education & technical assistance

                   

X

X

 

Richard King Mellon Foundation

American Land Conservation Program

 

X

X

                   

River Network

Watershed Assistance Grant

X

 

X

     

X

   

X

X

   

Trust for Public Land

Education & technical assistance

                 

X

X

X

 

The Pew Charitable Trusts

Grant program

                 

X

X

   

DuPont Corporate Contributions Program

Grant program

X

 

X

           

X

X

   

Charles Stewert Mott Foundation

Grant program

   

X

X

         

X

X

X

 

Surdna Foundation

Grant program

   

X

           

X

X

 

X

Great Lakes Aquatic Habitat Network and Fund

Grant program

X

 

X

X

     

X

X

X

     
 
   
Other Potential Sources of Support
• National Park Service
• State Parks
• Development Impact Fees
• Developer Dedications
• Dedicated Taxes (i.e. sales, property transfer)
• Special Improvement Districts
• Trail Sponsorships
• Fundraisers
• Pay to Use - revenue generating venues
• Sale of Easement for Utilities (i.e. cable, optic)
• Tourism Agencies
• Local Conservancy Groups - Land Trusts
• Public Arts Programs
• Organizational Support - Volunteers
• Scientific Research Programs/Schools
• Local Businesses
• Churches
• Recreation Clubs
• Pro Bono Professional Services (legal, financial)
 

2000 Northeast Ohio Regional Retail Analysis

Original Report by: Cuyahoga County Planning Commission for NOACA
(Summary of Strategy Recommendations, prepared by D. B. Hartt, Inc.)

IMPLICATIONS OF MAJOR RETAIL PROJECTS
Issue 1: Regional Impacts vs. Local Decision Making
• Local communities should understand the “true costs” of major retail development and its impacts on neighboring communities.
• Widening of major regional arterial roads takes away from the “main street” environment that many communities desire.
Issue 2: Consumption of Large Parcels vs. Other Needs
• Inventory of these properties is needed.
• Communities with these types of sites need to have appropriate zoning in place.
• Should open space be desired, strategies for preserving should be pursued such as Trust for Public Land and other preservation techniques.
Issue 3: Competition for Public Incentives
• Communities are in a bidding war for new development.
• State leadership is needed to assure revenue/cost sharing so that communities are discouraged from competing to attract new development.
Issue 4: Cocooning of Sites from Competitors
• Citizen and government pressure on corporate officials.
• Local government strict enforcement of building codes.
 
LAND USE AND ZONING
Issue 5: Community Assessment of Retail Needs
• Maintain updates comprehensive development.
• Identify an opportunity to create a town center or main street atmosphere as opposed to auto-oriented districts.
Issue 6: New Retail in Support of Existing Retail
• Encourage national chains to locate in older retail districts (i.e. main streets); retain local businesses whenever possible.
• Identify functionally obsolete industrial/retail sites and establish a land bank program that can assist developers to secure sites large enough to utilize in older, densely developed areas.
• Avoid the use of public subsidies (infrastructure assistance) for retail projects that provide direct competition for existing retail districts.
• Conduct a retail market analysis for the existing retail districts to determine retail uses that would complement established businesses and promote clustering of such establishments.
Issue 7: Using Land Use Regulation for Retail
• Carefully assess development proposals requiring a rezoning or other legislative actions.
• Impose a moratorium on rezoning actions until a comprehensive plan update is complete.
• Identify areas within the community that are anticipated to receive pressure for rezoning to retail use and assess implications in the plan update process The Courts are receptive to communities that proactively assess land use alternatives.
• Require an impact analysis to assess impacts of new retail on traffic, employment, tax generation, city services, land use compatability, infrastructure, stormwater run-off, parking and the environment (including regional level service agencies such as NEORSD, etc.).
Issue 8: Outdated Retail Strips
• Communities should cluster retail uses around existing major intersections through zoning (density bonuses) and infrastructure investments.
• Where there is considerable retail present in a community, consider rezoning vacant retail property to other uses or to a district that permits a mix of uses.
• Permit mixed-use development by right along major arterials and assure that the retail component is proportional and does not overwhelm the other uses.
Issue 9: Meeting the Retail Needs of Exurban Areas
• Outlying communities should carefully plan locations for retail stores so as to prevent the haphazard development that occurs when land is purchased speculatively around freeway interchanges.
• Support the retail zoned areas with infrastructure investments to facilitate development in the targeted areas.
• Consider rezoning commercial land to less intensive uses if that land is likely to be developed as strip retail developments.
Issue 10: Big Box Stores
• Communities can impose maximum size restrictions on new stores and tighten restrictions in areas that are currently comprised on smaller stores (50,000 square feet could be considered as a size cap).
• Utilize “design standards” for commercial developments, including big box retail stories, to achieve the type of development desired.
• Encourage national retailers to locate to existing downtown or “city center” locations, preferably as adaptive re-use projects where existing buildings are vacant.
• Should a big-box retailer close in your community, immediately assess potential alternatives—including non-retail uses—and take action to implement the desired type of development.
Issue 11: Parking in Older Retail Areas
• Monitor the active utilization of parking areas over different times of the day.
• Should more parking be required, assess a variety of options including transit.
• Designate specific areas for employee parking that leave choice parking for customers.
• If metering is used, allow 30 to 60 of free time for convenience shoppers.
• Promote shared parking arrangements.
Issue 12: Parking for Large Developments
• Adopt a 1 space/250 sq. ft. standard (as opposed to 1/200).
• Where transit serves an area, establish maximum parking standards.
• Enforce handicapped parking regulations.
Issue 13: Screening Parking from View
• Improve signage and lighting at rear entrance parking.
Issue 14: Marking Parking Lots Pedestrian Friendly
• Reduce parking requirements.
• Discourage massive front yard parking areas and encourage side and rear yard parking.
• Prohibit center block teardowns.
• Adopt zoning provisions that use landscaping in parking.
• Require parking lot setbacks of 5 or 10 feet with appropriate landscaping.
• Work with property owners to establish pedestrian safe routes.
• Incorporate environment supportive management practices.
Issue 15: Traffic Congestion
• Retail stores generate more traffic than any other type of land use.
• Require traffic impact studies to be provided by an independent traffic engineer before approving major retail.
• Encourage retail to locate in existing retail districts.
• Discourage retail strip development in undeveloped areas with zoning.
• Consider marginal road construction in areas of severe congestion to eliminate access.
• Working with property owners and developers to provide pedestrian and bicycle linkages to adjacent neighborhoods.
Issue 16: Post-Development Congestion
• Link transit centers with retail to reduce car traffic.
• Work with property owners to offer transit, bike and pedestrian alternatives.
Issue 17: Maintaining Healthy Retail Districts
• Market and promote the business district as a single entity.
• Consider using business overlay zoning to assure compatibility.
• Promote the uniqueness of community historic retail districts located n the neighborhoods of older cities and small downtowns.
• Reestablish storefront retailing in downtown Cleveland and larger cities in area counties.
• Use Business Improvement Districts to provide additional revenues for improvements and security.
• Promote linkages of the retail to traffic generators such as schools, courts, other municipal functions); require new government office to locate in or near an existing retail area.
• Work with merchants to provide for upkeep of retail areas.
• Evaluate build-out scenarios for retail and plan for that level; work with County planning commissions and MPOs to achieve.
• Promote buy-local programs.
• Provide for a strong police presence in retail areas.
• Promote retail mix to encourage visitors to stay longer.
• Prohibit temporary signs and the temporary sales in vacant lots in retail areas.
 
PHYSICAL DESIGN
Issue 18: Combating Poor Design
• In areas that are built out to the sidewalk, require infill development to do the same.
• Encourage foundation plantings.
• Work with merchants to secure storefront renovation funds where available.
Issue 19: Promoting Regulations for Better Design
• Develop detailed design guidelines to promote compatibility.
• Review and enhance sign regulations in zoning code.
• Improve buffering standards between commercial and residential.
• Discourage the use of paper and boards to cover vacant store windows.
• If big box is permitted, encourage design details that would make for reuse should they become vacant.
 
BUILDING REUTILIZATION, MODIFICATIONS AND REDEVELOPMENT
Issue 20: Conversion of Residential to Retail
• Work to permit converted use of historic homes where needed.
• Discourage front yard parking.
• Where there are concentrations of historic structures on major arterials, consider converting to residence/professional office use or traditional use in the zoning code.
Issue 21: Preserving Existing Buildings
• Conduct an inventory of historically and architecturally significant buildings to consider preserving; adopt an ordinance listing these properties and impose regulations on their use.
Issue 22: Keeping Local Businesses Competitive
• Work with businesses on façade programs, promotional strategies and other ways of making them more attractive to shoppers.
• Streetscape improvements to enhance the area
 
RETAIL SITE SELECTION
Issue 23: Avoid the “One Size Fits All” Syndrome
• Discourage national retailers from imposing a single design in every location that they build.
Issue 24: Retailing Opportunities in Central Cities
• Central city and inner ring suburban communities need to be advocates of their communities providing data to developers to support market demand and lobbying legislators for tools to make them more competitive.
Issue 25: Avoiding Retail Property Tax Reductions
• There appears to be an excessive number of requests made and granted for tax reduction, and a regional study and policy is needed.